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This is the clay rabbit that is part of the table for the ChairiTable coming up on Friday, March 15th at the Chandler Center for the Arts.  The funds raised by the event are for visual and performing arts education. Please check out this link for more information.

The inspiration for the piece is desert life.  Spending so much time in cars and even driving out to go somewhere and hike, a lot of our view of the desert is just fleeting impressions.  The name of the piece is “Desert Impressions”.

When I first saw this picture it reminded me of dinosaurs.  I like that he looks like the hunter and not the hunted.  You wouldn’t want to meet this jack rabbit in a dark alley.

http://www.visiongallery.org/chairitable-main.html

The rabbit is made of clay, not fired, and sealed with an acrylic coating.  He was built by first constructing a wire mesh structure and then building the clay onto the sub-structure a layer at a time.  After drying completely, it’s sprayed with an acrylic coating.

tablefront

         tablerabbside         tableagaveside

The table is painted with acrylic paints and pencils.  The entire table is sealed with multiple layers of acrylic coatings.  The top of the table is shown below.  This was an enjoyable project and well worth the time!  Hope to see you there.

tabletop

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The Museum for Youth that has been in downtown Mesa for years is re-inventing itself and changing its name.   They did this great little postcard that’s kind of stereo-vision….tilt it one way and it’s the old/existing AMY name…tilt it slightly the other way, and it’s the new “idea MUSEUM”.  When you see the name from either direction, you can still see a shadow of the other name slightly in the background.  It’s a very apt postcard for the transition they are undertaking.

The museum has been a fabulous place for kids of all ages to come and see really good and interesting art covering a variety of subjects.  They provide classes, demonstrations and special events.  It’s a great environment for exploring and learning…..and now it will be even better.

The museum wants to build on their established foundation as a great place for art and add to it science, imagination, and design.  Visit their website and stay tuned as they go on this journey of re-invention! http://arizonamuseumforyouth.com/

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rabbit on fire, two ears

…working on some clay rabbit pendants. They grew out of my prints and paintings. I just felt like getting my hands back in clay a bit lately and working some three-dimensional pieces. Red ears = “on fire”….goes with some specific prints I’m working on. These guys range from 1/2″ to 1.5” tall. I had just finished painting and sealing these two rabbits today when a friend stopped by with a belated Christmas gift…it was an eight inch tall clay rabbit playing a horn wrapped around its head – too funny, must be in the air.

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rabbit on fire, one ear

Looking forward to Art in the Garden at Shemer Art Center in Phoenix coming up in mid-March!

          

Chunky Book

Chunky Book

Last Saturday, I taught a Kidz Art class at Vision Gallery. I get the opportunity to this 2-3 times a year. Vision, through grants, provides these types of classes free to the community all year long. The classes are taught by professional artists and well organized and supplied. They do a fantastic job of administering them by bringing in artists from the community. Classes are usually between 15-20 kids each, parents always attend and stay for the full class. The kids have a great time and learn some new art techniques. Contact Vision Gallery for more information: 480.782.2695, or see their website:http://www.visiongallery.org/

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We did a chunky book using two blocks of wood, different kinds of paper, glue stick and ribbons. I enjoy the challenge of coming up with projects that will be of intereest to various age groups, safe for all ages, and still teach a little bit about art or art methods.

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They were a fantastic group of kids and thanks to Vision and all the parents for keeping this great arts opportunity out there in the community.

              

reflection in Queen Creek

reflection in Queen Creek

I went for a walk up at Boyce Thompson Arboretum first thing on first day. It was a frosty morning.

pomegranate hedge edging the herb garden

pomegranate hedge edging the herb garden

 

  

 

Ben, the big dog, came with…first paw prints on the frosty suspension bridge over Queen Creek. Tried to get photos of the huge cottonwoods in Queen Creek Canyon, below Pickett Post House…facing into the sun though, couldn’t get them. Amazed that the leaves were still hanging onto the trees on first of year.     

frosty suspension bridge

frosty suspension bridge

gathering for warmth

gathering for warmth

Caught the cactus greeting the sun. 

found part of a beehive on the wall in the demonstation garden

found part of a beehive on the wall in the demonstation garden

"on the front porch"

“on the front porch”

Watercolor and gouache paintings 8″ x 8″, done in November this year.  Working on a series of the flowers I saw out and about this fall.  I did quick reference watercolors on site and took some photos. This is the cactus flower from the front porch.

The light-colored fuchsia flower we saw at the Red Butte Garden and Arboretum in one of the hanging baskets.  Red Butte is on the side of the Wasatch Mountains in Salt Lake City.  It’s a non-profit garden with all types of gardens.  They have water conservation ideas and a low water use demonstration gardens.  Every time I’ve been there, they also have a fantastic art exhibit on the upper level of the admin building.  Great place to spend the day.

"fuschsia at Red Butte"

“fuschsia at Red Butte”

Will post more paintings as I go.

I don’t remember flowers in the fall from childhood.  I lived in Pennsylvania and Connecticut; cold, then snow in the fall.  Flowers were for the spring. 

This flower appears most autumns in October or  November on the thorny succulent that lives on the front porch.  The plant has long spindly arms radiating in all directions from a bulbous spiny base.  The arms are so long that, while they start out growing upward, they end up lounging and falling to the sides of the base and eventually many touch the ground.